Papers on Language I

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Tuesday
2:00 pm – 3:45 pm
Room H

  • Julia Wasserfall, “English Language Ideologies and Use in Taiwan”
  • Yezi Mu, “Foreign Influence or Indigenous Language Change: A Comparative Study on the Expressions of Tense and Aspect between the Daoxing bore jing and its Sanskrit Counterpart”
  • Alexandra Sizova, “Achievements and Challenges in Teaching Mandarin Chinese in Russia’s Contemporary System of Secondary Education”
  • Wen-Huei Cheng, Chi-Tsuan Lin, “A Study on the Acceptance and Changes of the Concept of ‘Western Studies’ 西學 in Modern China via Vocabulary and Concepts”

Julia Wasserfall, “English Language Ideologies and Use in Taiwan”

In the Sinophone world, English has and continues to play diverse roles, such as former colonial, official, and foreign language. In Taiwan, it has served as the paramount, and at times only, foreign language in educational policies. However, political discussions about its official status have arisen both at the turn of the century and as recently as 2018. In 2013, the southern city of Tainan announced to become bilingual (Mandarin/ English) within ten years and institutionalized this plan by inaugurating the Office of English as the Second Official Language (OEASEOL) in 2015. Although exposure to English has increased through language-in-education and linguistic landscape planning, its use remains mainly restricted to language instruction classes and international communication. However, the insertion of English words, phrases, and at times even full sentences is a common occurrence not only in everyday speech but also print and audio-visual media.
Based on the framework of language policy, identifying language ideologies and language planning as well as language practices as mutually interdependent in the study of speakers’ linguistic choices (i.a. Spolsky 2004, 2009), this paper takes a closer look at English language ideologies in Taiwan. By analysing parliamentary debates, English language curricula, national plans, and interview transcripts both official and private discourses are taken into account. The result shows how speakers negotiate negative and positive narratives of English and how these shape language choices and patterns of English language use in Taiwan.

Yezi Mu, “Foreign Influence or Indigenous Language Change: A Comparative Study on the Expressions of Tense and Aspect between the Daoxing bore jing and its Sanskrit Counterpart”

Early Chinese Buddhist texts as the translations or compositions based on Indian Buddhist texts are supposed to be the earliest outcome of historical language contact between ancient Indic languages, early Literary Chinese and early vernacular Chinese. They demonstrate many linguistic features which are not attested in Chinese pre-Buddhist literature and their contemporary Chinese non-Buddhist texts. Some believe that these peculiar features were triggered by the contact with Indic languages while others argue that they were actually results of native language change. This research focuses on the expressions of two common grammatical categories, the tense and aspect, in an authentic early Chinese Buddhist text, the Daoxing bore jing (DXBR), and discusses whether there could be any Indic influences or not by comparing it with its extant Sanskrit counterpart, the Aṣṭasāhasrikā Prajñāpāramitā Sūtra, which basically share the same content. The comparative analysis indicates that although sentences are often marked in the same type of tense in DXBR and its Sanskrit counterpart, there do exist some inexplicable exceptions. Besides, issues concerning the expressions of aspect are even more complicated as no clear correlations can be found. Such inconsistency between the Chinese text and its Sanskrit version suggests that DXBR, or early Chinese Buddhist texts in general, may have mainly adopted the expressions of tense and aspect from Chinese pre-Buddhist literature and ancient vernacular usage with only limited foreign influence.

Alexandra Sizova, “Achievements and Challenges in Teaching Mandarin Chinese in Russia’s Contemporary System of Secondary Education”

This paper presents the preliminary results of the study related to the current situation in teaching Mandarin Chinese at the secondary school level in the Russian Federation.
In the early 21st century, the increased interest to learning Chinese, mainly as a second foreign language (SFL), has been observed among Russian secondary school students. The popularity of this language may be predetermined by the set of factors, including the dynamics of Russian-Chinese strategic partnership, bilateral trade and cultural exchange, energetic PRC’s cultural diplomacy as well as the global trends of internationalisation, multilingualism, informatisation, the rise of attention to students’ communicative and intercultural competences being fully relevant to the modern educational setting in Russia, and others.
Meanwhile, the conceptual, organizational, methodological and practical aspects of institutionalisation and development of Chinese language as a new school subject in Russia has not yet received comprehensive analysis in academia. Based on the wide range of sources, this study aims to highlight some milestones of introduction and regulation of teaching Chinese in the national general education system, analyse the role of internal and external drivers of popularising Chinese language in Russian schools. It also considers recent achievements and challenges in organizing educational process and result assessment, creating relevant teaching materials and applying contemporary language instruction methods (Communicative Language Teaching (CLT), etc.) to Chinese language training practices faced by the pedagogical community and schools for the moment.

Wen-Huei Cheng, Chi-Tsuan Lin, “A Study on the Acceptance and Changes of the Concept of ‘Western Studies’ (西學) in Modern China via Vocabulary and Concepts”

This study is to explore the trend of global knowledge flow in modern China, via the scope of vocabulary and concepts. The reason behind this study is that “Western Studies” 西學 is treated as a source of new knowledge concept and a context and change of knowledge genealogy in the modern China. The proposed approach combines methods from concept history, conceptual history theory, digital technology and statistical analysis. The proposed method takes into account traditional humanities research, as well as digital technology, including statistical analysis of keywords and co-occurrence lexicons, concept networks, and time-series analysis. The goal is to outline the multi-layered trends in the dissemination and acceptance of new knowledge of “Western Studies” 西學 in the modern China. The generation and transformation of concepts and emotional aspects include the interactive relationship between the concepts, events, discourses, and actions referred to in “Western Studies” 西學, as well as large historical images of China’s modern transformation such as intellectual property system, knowledge structure, school system, and discipline system.

Event Timeslots (1)

Room H
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