Preliminary Conference Schedule

Sunday, 22 September 2019

8 am
Select an entry on the left to see further information.
9 am
10 am
11 am
12 noon
1 pm Registration GWZ
2 pm Board Meeting GWZ
3 pm
4 pm
5 pm
6 pm
7 pm Conference Warming TBD
8 pm
9 pm
10 pm

Event Details

  • :

    Registration

    (GWZ, foyer)

    Our student staff will be available throughout the academic programme at the registration desk and around the coffee-break tables.

    Feel free to ask them for information and to leave your coat or luggage with them.

  • :

    Board Meeting

    (GWZ, room H5 3.16)

    Meeting of the executive board and the advisory board of the Anglistenverband in preparation of the members’ assembly on Tuesday.

  • :

    Conference Warming

    (TBD)

    More information to be published here soon.

Monday, 23 September 2019

8 am Registration Foyer HS 2
Select an entry on the left to see further information.
9 am Opening and Award Ceremony TBD
10 am
Coffee Break Foyer HS 2
Keynote by James English HS 2
11 am
12 noon
1 pm
Panel Sections TBD
2 pm
3 pm Coffee Break TBD Junior Scholars Meet-Up TBD
Panel Sections TBD City Tour A in German TBD
4 pm
5 pm
Keynote by Jonathan Culpeper HS 2
6 pm
7 pm Reception New Town Hall
8 pm
9 pm City Tour B in German with a Night Guard New Town Hall
10 pm

Event Details

  • :

    Registration

    (Foyer HS 2)

    Our student staff will be available throughout the academic programme at the registration desk and around the coffee-break tables.

    Feel free to ask them for information and to leave your coat or luggage with them.

  • :

    Opening and Award Ceremony

    (Room TBD)

    This session is reserved for introductory remarks, speeches, and greetings. In addition, the Anglistenverband is set to award its postdoctoral dissertation prize.

    The list of speakers will be published here soon.

  • :

    Coffee Break

    (Foyer HS 2)

    Our student staff will be available throughout the academic programme at the registration desk and around the coffee-break tables.

    Feel free to ask them for information and to leave your coat or luggage with them.

  • :

    Keynote by James English

    (Room HS 2) Five Stars: Ratings and Esteem
    in the Digital Age

    We are accustomed to thinking of hierarchies of literary value in terms of canonicity (value in the academic system, gauged by metrics of citational and curricular frequency); consecration (value in the system of mainstream prestige, gauged by distribution of prizes, awards, and honors), popularity (value in the system of literary commerce, gauged by sales figures and bestseller lists); or personal preference (value in our own system of favorites and aversions, gauged by affective response and attachment). But these days the most ubiquitous and arguably the most influential form of literary valuation is the online rating, typically calculated on a five-star scale via an aggregation of reader scores. A high rating on this scale does not directly correlate with popularity, prestige, or canonicity, nor is it even a perfect reflection of the personal preferences of the individuals doing the rating. So what exactly is a five star rating, and what kind of value does it represent? How have we become so dependent on a metric whose meaning we do not really understand? In this talk, Jim English will trace the history of the five-star system, its transformations in the digital age, and its contemporary functions and affordances.

    Prof James English (Philadelphia)

    James F. English is John Welsh Centennial Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is also the founding director of the Price Lab for Digital Humanities. He received his MA from the University of Chicago and his PhD from Stanford. His main fields of research are the sociology and economics of culture; the history of literary studies as a discipline; and contemporary British fiction, film, and television. His first book Comic Transactions (Cornell UP) explored the joke-work of the political unconscious in the British novel from Conrad and Woolf to Lessing and Rushdie. Perhaps his most influential work to date, The Economy of Prestige (Harvard UP) is a study of the history, functions, and effects of prizes in literature and the arts. Economy of Prestige was named Best Academic Book of 2005 by New York Magazine. The Concise Companion to Contemporary British, a collection of essays about the scene and system of literary production in the UK, was published the following year by Blackwell. The Global Future of English was published in 2012 in the Blackwell Manifesto series. It rethinks the prevailing narratives of contraction and decline that dominate histories of the discipline, stressing instead the discipline’s expansion within a rapidly massifying global academic apparatus, and the new challenges and opportunities such sudden and dispersive growth presents.

    For a few years now, James English has been studying the effects of digitalization on literature and on reading and has also been using methods of the digital humanities for his own studies in literary sociology. His current book project is Beauty by the Numbers, a brief history of attempts to quantify aesthetic quality. An ongoing digital project proposes to periodize the field of contemporary Anglophone fiction by means of quantitative analysis of hand-built meta-data. Some results of this research were published in a special issue of Modern Language Quarterly on “Scale and Value: New & Digital Approaches to Literary History” that English co-edited with Ted Underwood. A related digital project is Mining Goodreads: Literary Reception Studies at Scale, which involves computational analysis of nearly 4 million book reviews from the Goodreads social reading site. Findings from this project will be published in a volume English is co-editing with Heather Love for Oxford UP.

  • :

    Panel Sections

    (Rooms TBD)

    Abstracts for the panel sections and the individual papers are provided below.

    Section 1
    Literature and 
? Perspectives on Interdisciplinarity

    Introduction
    Prof Dr Jens Martin Gurr (Dusiburg-Essen),
    PD Dr Ursula Kluwick (Bern)

    How Interdisciplinary is
    Interdisciplinary Research?
    Prof Dr Dirk Vanderbeke (Jena),
    Timea MĂ©szĂĄros (Jena)

    Science Fiction and Science Research:
    Performing Literary Research in an
    Astrophysics Department
    Dr ZoĂ« Lehmann Imfeld (ZĂŒrich)

    Better Stories about Science?
    The Contemporary Science Novel and
    the Field of ‘Literature and Science’
    Prof Dr Anton Kirchhofer (Oldenburg)

    Section 2
    Making Matter Matter: Page, Stage, Screen

    Paper titles to be published here soon.

    Section 3
    ‘Funny Men:’ Masculinities and
    Ridicule in Anglophone Cultures
    Iconic Eccentrics

    Introduction
    PD Dr Stefanie SchĂ€fer (Erlangen-NĂŒrnberg),
    Dr phil habil Wieland Schwanebeck (Dresden)

    Dickens and the Camp Aesthetic
    PD Dr. Franziska Quabeck (MĂŒnster)

    Mention the War: British Sitcoms
    and Military Masculinity
    Prof Dr Anette Pankratz (Bochum)

    Section 4
    Canonization in Times of
    Globalization and Digitization

    Paper titles to be published here soon.

    Section 5
    Orality, Literacy – and the Digital?
    New Perspectives on Language of Immediacy
    and Language of Distance

    Introduction
    Prof Dr Sarah Buschfeld (Dortmund),
    Dr Sven Leuckert (Dresden)

    Exploring the ‘Degree of Immediacy’ in
    Late Modern English Syntax
    Dr Lucia Siebers (Regensburg/Leipzig)

    Language of Immediacy, Language
    of Distance and Language Awareness –
    From Manuscript to Internet
    PD Dr Göran Wolf (Göttingen)

    “This word no get concrete meaning oo”: Pragmatic Markers in Nigerian Multilingual Online Communication
    Mirka Honkanen (Freiburg)

  • :

    Coffee Break

    (Room TBD)

    Our student staff will be available throughout the academic programme at the registration desk and around the coffee-break tables.

    Feel free to ask them for information and to leave your coat or luggage with them.

  • :

    Junior Scholars Meet-Up

    (Room TBD)

    Informal meet-up of junior scholars including PhD students and post-docs at the Anglistentag. Since this session is scheduled during a coffee break, coffee and other refreshments will be available.

    Eligibility for this meet-up is self-assigned.

  • :

    Panel Sections

    (Rooms TBD)

    Abstracts for the panel sections and the individual papers are provided below.

    Section 1
    Literature and 
? Perspectives on Interdisciplinarity

    Literature and Interdisciplinary (Health)
    Risk Research – Thought Styles, Probabilities,
    and Narratives of Uncertainty
    PD Dr Julia Hoydis (Köln)

    Interdisciplinarity Across the “Two-Cultures”
    PD Dr Marcus Hartner (Bielefeld)

    Section 2
    Making Matter Matter: Page, Stage, Screen

    Paper titles to be published here soon.

    Section 3
    ‘Funny Men:’ Masculinities and
    Ridicule in Anglophone Cultures
    Comic Personas

    Ricky Gervais’ Distorted Men
    Dr Nele Sawallisch (Mainz)

    Toxic Masculinity and Acid Humour: Negotiating Masculinities and Late Night Comedy
    Assistant Prof Ulla Ratheiser (Innsbruck)

    Section 4
    Canonization in Times of
    Globalization and Digitization

    Paper titles to be published here soon.

    Section 5
    Orality, Literacy – and the Digital?
    New Perspectives on Language of Immediacy
    and Language of Distance

    Constructing Immediacy at a Distance:
    The Comments Section of Online Blogs
    Dr Cornelia Gerhardt (SaarbrĂŒcken)

    “We are all in this together” – Balancing
    Virtual Proximity and Distance
    in Online Caregiver Discussions
    Prof Dr Birte Bös (Duisburg-Essen),
    Carolin Schneider (Duisburg-Essen)

    Digital Food Talk: Blurring Immediacy and Distance in YouTube Eating Shows
    Dr Sofia RĂŒdiger (Bayreuth)

  • :

    City Tour A in German

    (Starting point TBD)

    City tour that explores the most well-known sites in Leipzig’s city centre by foot.

    This guided tour is in German. If you want to join, please register in advance since a minimum number of twelve participants is needed.

  • :

    Keynote by Jonathan Culpeper

    (Room HS 2) Reflections on ‘Writtenness’ and ‘Spokenness’ and the English Language

    This lecture encompasses a series of reflections on ‘writtenness’ and ‘spokenness’ in and across the English Language especially in Britain. It begins with the present-day and one of the most prevalent myths in British culture: when posh people speak, they do not ‘drop’ (i.e. fail to pronounce) the letters of the written form. I examine this myth, and also the myth that American English is corrupting British. Both myths, I argue, relate to what sociolinguists have referred to as the “standard language ideology” (e.g. Milroy and Milroy [1985] 1992). This is, essentially, a belief system revolving around the idea that there is only one correct spoken variety of language which is modelled on a single correct written form. This ideology, I propose, also encompasses writers, who, accordingly, are imbued with superhuman abilities. With this in mind I consider one further myth, the myth that Shakespeare created many thousands of new words for the English language. Of course, the standard language ideology assumes one written variety with high value. Historically, however, such a variety has more often than not been lacking. At this point, I introduce a more descriptive approach to ‘writtenness’ and ‘spokenness’, one revolving around three categories, namely, the degree to which a text is speech-like, speech-based or speech-purposed. This descriptive approach is part of the work on spoken interaction in historical English writing that I conducted over 20 years with Merja Kytö (e.g. Culpeper and Kytö 2010). I discuss some of our findings, in particular what we termed ‘pragmatic noise’ (essentially, primary interjections, the noises – ooh’s and aah’s – that facilitate conversation.) I also discuss the genre of play-texts, a complex hybrid genre, and how it has changed over the centuries. As a coda to this lecture, I bring the focus back to the present day. I offer some observations on online sarcasm, especially in comparison with spoken sarcasm, and thereby note some of the resources a digital medium deploys.

    Culpeper, Jonathan and Merja Kytö (2010). Early Modern English Dialogues: Spoken Interaction in Writing. Cambridge: CUP.

    Milroy, James and Lesley Milroy ([1985] 1992). Authority in Language: Investigating Language Prescription and Standardisation. London: Routledge.

    Prof Jonathan Culpeper (Lancaster)

    Jonathan Culpeper is chair of Linguistics and English Language at Lancaster University. In his research, he focuses, amongst other things, on orality and literacy, most noticeably in his work on the exploitation of historical written material for the analysis of spoken language. A central publication on this topic is the monograph Early Modern English Dialogues: Spoken Interaction as Writing (2010, Cambridge University Press, co-authored with Merja Kytö). In this book, Culpeper and Kytö classify certain text types as “speech-based”, “speech-purposed”, and “speech-like”, partially solving the ‘bad data problem’, which lamented the issue of having to rely on written texts for the analysis of spoken language of the past. Another of Culpeper’s main research interests is pragmatics, the exploration of language in its situational, context-sensitive dimensions. An important publication is the Palgrave Handbook of Linguistic (Im)politeness (2017, Palgrave Macmillan, co-edited with Michael Haugh and DĂĄniel Z. KĂĄdĂĄr); various papers on politeness theory as well as on connections between pragmatics and other disciplines such as corpus linguistics have been published by Culpeper in numerous prestigious journals (e.g. Journal of Historical Pragmatics, Journal of Pragmatics, International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, Journal of Politeness Research).

    In addition to his linguistically-inclined research, Culpeper has published widely on interdisciplinary topics. His work on Shakespeare is a case in point, with a major publication being the book Stylistics and Shakespeare: Transdisciplinary Approaches (2011, Continuum, co-edited with Mireille Ravassat). In his plenary talk, Jonathan Culpeper will also bridge several gaps: between orality and literacy, between British and American English, and between literary and cultural studies and linguistics.

  • :

    Reception

    (New Town Hall)

    More information to be published here soon.

  • :

    City Tour B in German with a Night Guard

    (New Town Hall)

    City tour that explores the most well-known sites in Leipzig’s city centre by foot. The tour is guided by a costumed night guard.

    This guided tour is in German. If you want to join, please register in advance since a minimum number of 15 participants is needed.

Tuesday, 24 September 2019

8 am
Select an entry on the left to see further information.
9 am Keynote by Tom McCarthy HS 2
10 am Coffee Break Foyer HS 2 Poster Session TBD
Members’ Assembly HS 2 City Tour C in English TBD
11 am
12 noon
1 pm
2 pm
3 pm Panel Sections TBD
4 pm
Workshops A & B on University TeachingTBD
5 pm City Tour D in German TBD
6 pm
7 pm
Conference Dinner Auerbachs Keller
8 pm
9 pm
10 pm

Event Details

  • :

    Keynote by Tom McCarthy

    (Room HS 2) From Paper to Pulp: A Report
    from No Man’s Land

    Translated into over 20 languages, adapted for cinema and theatre and honoured with several awards, the novels of Tom McCarthy could be seen as bringing several of the themes of this conference into perfect alignment. Not only do they move across a wide interdisciplinary range, drawing on (inter alia) anthropology, psychoanalysis, philosophy, political theory and cinema; they also display a recurrent preoccupation with materiality, with the untranslatability – or ‘baseness’ – of plain, simple matter. In this keynote, he discusses both his own practice and his understanding of literature tout court in terms of in-betweens, impurity and mess.

    Tom McCarthy (London)

    Bio note to be published here soon.

  • :

    Coffee Break

    (Foyer HS 2)

    Our student staff will be available throughout the academic programme at the registration desk and around the coffee-break tables.

    Feel free to ask them for information and to leave your coat or luggage with them.

  • :

    Poster Session

    (Room TBD)

    The posters produced in advance of workshop B on “The Digital in Research-Oriented Teaching: Interdisciplinary Exchange” at 4:45 pm will be available to look at throughout the academic programme. During this coffee break, however, poster authors will also answer your questions.

  • :

    Members’ Assembly

    (Room HS 2)

    An invitation to this meeting along with the agenda will be sent to eligible participants.

    Please note that the participation in this assembly is limited to members of the Anglistenverband.

  • :

    City Tour C in English

    (Starting point TBD)

    City tour that explores the most well-known sites in Leipzig’s city centre by foot.

    This guided tour is in English. If you want to join, please register in advance since a minimum number of twelve participants is needed.

  • :

    Panel Sections

    (Rooms TBD)

    Abstracts for the panel sections and the individual papers are provided below.

    Section 1
    Literature and 
? Perspectives on Interdisciplinarity

    From Law-and-Literature to Law and the Humanities, Law and Culture
 and Beyond?
    Dr Susanne Gruß (Erlangen)

    Literature and 
 Business Studies.
    Conflicts and Crossovers
    Dr Caroline Kögler (MĂŒnster)

    Summary
    Prof Dr Jens Martin Gurr (Dusiburg-Essen),
    PD Dr Ursula Kluwick (Bern)
    Section 2
    Making Matter Matter: Page, Stage, Screen

    Paper titles to be published here soon.

    Section 3
    ‘Funny Men:’ Masculinities and
    Ridicule in Anglophone Cultures
    Aging Men

    The Imitation Competition:
    Comic Masculinity in Midlife Crisis in
    Michael Winterbottom’s The Trip Series
    Prof Dr Lucia KrÀmer (Passau)

    Laughable Old Men: Conceptions of Aging Masculinities in the Britcom
    Franziska Röber (Dresden)

    Summary
    PD Dr Stefanie SchĂ€fer (Erlangen-NĂŒrnberg),
    Dr phil habil Wieland Schwanebeck (Dresden)

    Section 4
    Canonization in Times of
    Globalization and Digitization

    Paper titles to be published here soon.

    Section 5
    Orality, Literacy – and the Digital?
    New Perspectives on Language of Immediacy
    and Language of Distance

    Tweeting with Trump: An Analysis of
    Trump’s Twitter Language
    Prof Dr Patricia Ronan (Dortmund)

    Tertiary Orality? Rereading Walter Ong
    in the Posthumanist Era
    Prof Dr Theresa Heyd (Greifswald)

    Summary
    Prof Dr Sarah Buschfeld (Dortmund),
    Dr Sven Leuckert (Dresden)

  • :

    Workshops A & B on
    University Teaching

    (Rooms TBD)

    If you want to participate in one of these workshops, please register in advance. Workshop A is in German.

    Das Anglistikstudium im Spannungsfeld von Schule und UniversitÀt

    More information to be published here soon.

    The Digital in Research-Oriented Teaching: Interdisciplinary Exchange

    The ubiquity of the digital in research and society raises important questions concerning the competences and skills to be conveyed to future generations by the university. Currently, the first born-digital generation is entering the universities. Students of this generation are interacting with everyday technology in a very casual way, yet, they are just as new to the utility of digital technologies in their course of studies, as they are unfamiliar with their newly chosen subjects of study and their contents.

    University teaching can nowadays build upon the openness and curiosity of this generation concerning digital technology. At the same time, it is facing the challenge of aligning the possibilities offered by digital technology with the requirements of philological and cultural studies aspects of the courses of study in order to enable students critically engage with said technologies in an academic context. It is important that the teaching of digital technology is integrated into the study of language, literature and culture in order to convey to students its relevance in research, teaching and the workplace. University education must thus prepare aspiring academics and scientists as well as teachers for work, life and research in a digital society and make them aware of the methodological and theoretical implications.

    Digital technology poses opportunities and challenges for the development of university teaching; these are frequently taken up in research-oriented teaching formats. Our workshop session invites participants to share their concepts and experiences from research-oriented teaching formats. We invite poster presentations optionally including demos of websites, teaching materials and software. The workshop will also include a panel discussion to spark further exchange about experiences and challenges and offer a forum for discussion on the role of the digital in teaching to a wider plenum.

    Organisers: Dr Sabine Bartsch
    and Prof Angelika Zirker.

    Further information: workshop website.

  • :

    City Tour D in German

    (Starting point TBD)

    City tour that explores the most well-known sites in Leipzig’s city centre by foot.

    This guided tour is in German. If you want to join, please register in advance since a minimum number of twelve participants is needed.

  • :

    Conference Dinner

    (Auerbachs Keller)

    More information to be published here soon.

Wednesday, 25 September 2019

8 am
Select an entry on the left to see further information.
9 am
Excursion to Colditz Castle Bus stop Goethestraße
10 am Workshop C on Post-Doc OpportunitiesGWZ
11 am
12 noon
1 pm
2 pm
3 pm
4 pm
5 pm
6 pm
7 pm
8 pm
9 pm
10 pm

Event Details

  • :

    Excursion to Colditz Castle

    (Bus stop Goethestraße)

    The minimum number of participants is 25. The fee for this excursion includes a lunch bag. You can safely deposit your luggage on the bus throughout the trip. The excursion ends near Leipzig main station, but we recommend booking your departure no earlier than 2:30 pm due to possible delays and traffic.

    Schedule

    9:15 am: meeting at the bus stop Goethestraße near Leipzig main station

    9:30 am: departure to Colditz Castle

    10:20 am: arrival at Colditz Castle

    10:30 am: guided tour of the castle in English with a focus on the history of British prisoners of war and their attempts to escape

    12 noon: time to explore the castle by yourself

    1 pm: return to Leipzig

    2 pm: arrival in Leipzig

  • :

    Workshop C on Post-Doc Opportunities

    (GWZ, room R 2010)

    If you want to participate in this workshop,
    please register in advance. The workshop
    is in German.

    Schritte nach der Promotion

    Der Workshop richtet sich insbesondere an Post-Docs und Promovierende in der Endphase, die mehr ĂŒber die akademischen Schritte nach der Promotion erfahren wollen. Inhaltlich skizzieren wir Wege und Schritte nach der Promotion, die mit Blick auf Berufbarkeit und Professur wichtig sind. Neben fachlichen Überlegungen werden wir uns auch den administrativen Schritten sowie dem Lehrportfolio widmen.

    Organisers: Prof Ilka Mindt, Dr Sandra Dinter,
    Dr Philip Jacobi, Dr Sven Leuckert,
    and Prof Felix Sprang.

Colour Key

  • Academic Programme
  • Social Programme
  • Group Meeting
  • Breaks

Open Call for Poster Presentations

Dr Sabine Bartsch and Prof Angelika Zirker invite poster presentations of concepts and experiences with digital teaching formats for their workshop “The Digital in Research-Oriented Teaching: Interdisciplinary Exchange” during the Anglistentag 2019. Please send your abstract of approximately 300 to 500 words by 15 May 2019. For the full call please refer to the organisers’ workshop website.

Panel Sections and Abstracts

There are five sections at the Anglistentag 2019 as part of the academic programme. The original calls for papers are provided below, and the the individual abstracts will be made available here soon. They were selected by the section organisers.

Section 1
Literature and 
? Perspectives on Interdisciplinarity
Prof. Dr. Jens Martin Gurr (Duisburg-Essen)
PD Dr. Ursula Kluwick (Bern)
Call for Papers
Email Organisers
Section 2
Making Matter Matter: Page, Stage, Screen
Prof. Dr. Ingrid Hotz-Davies (TĂŒbingen)
Prof. Dr. Martin Middeke (Augsburg)
Prof. Dr. Christoph Reinfandt (TĂŒbingen)
Call for PapersEmail Organisers
Section 3
‘Funny Men:’ Masculinities and Ridicule in Anglophone Cultures
PD Dr. Stefanie SchÀfer (Erlangen)
Dr. Wieland Schwanebeck (Dresden)
Call for PapersEmail Organisers
Section 4
Canonization in Times of Globalization and Digitization
PD Dr. Kai Wiegandt (Berlin)
Jun.-Prof. Dr. Jens Elze (Göttingen)
Call for PapersEmail Organisers
Section 5
Orality, Literacy – and the Digital? New Perspectives on Language of Immediacy and Language of Distance
Dr. Sarah Buschfeld (Regensburg)
Dr. Sven Leuckert (Dresden)
Call for PapersEmail Organisers

The five sections at the Anglistentag 2019 in Leipzig are the result of a vote held during the members’ assembly of the Anglistenverband in 2018. For more information on this process please refer to the guidelines for section organisers.